Duke Performances

Ciompi Quartet

Sunday, November 15, 2020 | 7:00 pm


Duke Performances is excited to present our Virtual Fall season – The Show Must Go Online! High-quality, commissioned films featuring artists originally slated for in-person performances will premiere on Vimeo for ticket holders. Each film, shot following local safety protocols, is made in collaboration with an audio and video crew in each artist’s home city. 

General admission tickets are available for free. Duke Student tickets are also available free of charge through the support of the Provost and the Vice Provost for the Arts at Duke University. Before the premiere, ticket buyers will receive a unique Vimeo link to stream each performance online at the scheduled time. After the conclusion of the premiere, films will be available for viewing for 24 hours.

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The Ciompi Quartet opens its 2020/2021 season with an eclectic program spanning four centuries of music. The evening opens with Webern’s Langsamer Satz, a deeply expressive, emotional and tonal work written by Webern at age 21, on holiday and deeply in love with his cousin and future wife, Wilhelmine Mortl.  Duke composer Stephen Jaffe’s Third String Quartet, “A Tapestry,” follows; the piece was a 2014 commission by the Ciompi. Jaffe himself describes the piece as a “gathering of musical fragments woven into a whole,” an entwining of musical thoughts ranging in length from one to five minutes. To close the program, the quartet will perform one of Mozart’s early masterpieces — the fifth of his “Viennese” quartets. Written when Mozart was just seventeen, the work is a sign of his maturity and mastery of galant style.

— Harrison Russin

Program

Webern: Langsamer Satz (1905)
Stephen Jaffe: String Quartet No. 3 “A Tapestry” (2014)
Mozart: String Quartet in B-Flat Major, K. 172

 

 

 

Student tickets for Duke Performances’ Virtual Fall season are made possible through generous support from the Provost and the Vice Provost for the Arts at Duke University.

Courtney Liu & Ciompi Quartet & Dvorak


“From beginning to end, the playing sounded intelligent and sure.”

The New York Times

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